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IN CONVERSATION WITH: Cory Wong

WORDS BY: JOEL MALLEN

Funky, fun and full of cartilage, Cory Wong is fast becoming a global leading light in a renaissance of uptempo funk. A consistent collaborator with Vulfpeck (to the point where they have a full track reserved just for him as an album closer), he is making a noise with his giddy, positive vibe and bafflingly loose spider hands, somehow sounding tight and rich in musicianship. I had the honour of catching up with him over a vegan burger and sweet potato fries, just before his headline show at Gorilla.

What would be your blurb? How would you describe yourself?

I am a musician that plays music to spread joy to the world. A lot of guitar-led bands, it’s about the guitar player – it’s about “look what I can do”. For me, my guiding light is not about showing off flashy moves. If those come out, great! But my guiding light is to leave my show and listening to my records thinking “Oh wow, that was really fun”, or “oh wow, that put me in a good mood”. It might sound cheesy, but that really is a thing for me.

How does your right hand just, like, do that? Is it dislocated?

Well, I am able to have it very loose but in control – I have a very flexible wrist, and I guess I’ve just practised a lot.

Growing up in Minneapolis, you’ve mentioned how Prince was a real influence on you – did that influence your style from a very young age?

Yeah, I mean I started as a punk rock and ska kid: Green Day, Red Hot Chili Peppers, that sort of thing. But Prince is just kinda everywhere; it’s in the water, it’s in the air, you can’t really avoid it. It’s just how it is.


Was your main source of development rooted in experiences with rhythm bands growing up, or more from discovering artists like Prince?

It’s more from discovering artistry. Even developing my own sound and style was a by-product of learning so deeply the catalogue of Prince, Pat Metheny, Earth, Wind & Fire. Learning it so intimately, and then completely abandoning it to find who I am. I had some mentors that were like “Dude, you gotta stop sounding like Prince, you’ve gotta sound like you. That’s what people wanna hear – nobody’s ever gonna be as good as Prince at being Prince, just as no-one is gonna be as good as you as being you”.

What’s your main impression of the Manchester scene and the UK scene? I know you do a lot of work with the RNCM, masterclasses and the like.

It’s fun to see that there are so many scenes, from all over the world, that have a vibrant arts culture and music business culture as well. The UK in general is such a thriving area for musicians. It’s fun to experience and see this music college that reminds me so much of my own school; it’s very global now.

Your last album The Optimist came out last August – what was your favourite moment or song to record?

My favourite one on there is 91 Maxima. It was a fun song to record, I had an idea of what I wanted to do video wise. I just had some fun little tricks I wanted to do, I didn’t think I would pull it  off, but I did! I really enjoyed Jax and Light As Anything, because I was able to pull off the palindrome, a two drummer drum-kit, a lefty and righty with one kick in the middle. That was a fun, cool thing.

What’s the next step in terms of your recorded music? Are you planning on getting more adventurous with your sound?

I have a bunch of music already recorded for my next record that I feel really good about. Some of this upcoming record is some more collaborations, which I’m really excited about: some that have already happened, some that are coming up which I can’t believe are going to happen. I don’t wanna jinx it, but there’s some big ones, some heroes of mine. I wanna continue to step out as a guitar player led ensemble, in general that’s adventurous to me as a non-shred guy.

Your music seems a very positive force, would you consider that more of a release from you and the music justifies the means, or would you consider that just your outlook on life?

I consider myself a positive person in most areas, but yes I do believe there is a bit of that feedback loop thing, it grows and grows. But I’m mainly just a positive person.

 

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#airbud

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You’re famous across the pond for your jam night in Minneapolis. How important is jamming? What would you say to any young player that is a bit tentative to get on stage?

I’d say it’s formative to them. The word “jamming” can mean a lot of different things to different people.

Because in the higher jazz circles for example, it’s viewed as more like a “cutting session”. Do you think it should be competitive?

Well I’m always out for blood, but I’m not gonna cut any heads. I’m always looking for great musicians to play with. I try to push myself and others in those situations to see how great of a moment we can get. But I think it’s a good thing for growth. The other thing is just to go and hang and be part of a scene, I think that’s the most important thing, and finding a scene that you belong in musically and personally, seeing who you align with.

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ALBUM RELEASE: Foals- ‘Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost (Part 1)’

WORDS BY: EVE WHITESIDE

This record is one of the most eagerly anticipated in recent years, as the Oxford alternative indie-rock group return with a vengeance after their four year break from releasing music. With the suspense bubbling over during their silent period, the bar was set very high for their comeback. Returning for this year’s tour, with a borrowed bassist from Everything Everything, things are visibly different this time which aptly reflects the state of the world portrayed through this album. The focus is direct and clear: doubt and caution for our threatened planet are saturated throughout the record, and intertwined through every track and lyric.

Our very first glimpse of the record was standout track, Exits, which encapsulates the current state of crisis our planet is in. Front man Philippakis’ brooding vocals echo throughout regarding how completely upside down and fated our world has become as he remarks “I wish I could figure it out, but the world’s upside down”. This track is a statement, possessing the band’s signature sound that sets them apart. With this track and the rest of the album still featuring an array of their familiar confident plucky guitar riffs that were ever-present in What Went Down and Holy Fire – there is a definitive move onto something new and futuristic.

Throughout Syrups there is a prominent striking bass line and slow burning melody, whilst the overall air of the track is ladened with the disappointment of the world. The landscape of the track hinting at the way digitisation has developed and our cities decimated around us – “all the kids have left the towns, foxes howl and preachers bow down”. Similarly, On The Luna features the ominous bridge “we had it all, we didn’t stop to think about it” which echoes the naivety of our nation when facing the issues of climate change – particularly fitting with the tropical February we experienced just a week ago. This is also reflected in the album title itself, with the underlying message to make the most of what you have while you have it, and save it. Despite this underlying message the track itself is simultaneously a classic, feel-good indie anthem.

 

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The mighty Q @qmagazineuk Photo credit: Alex Lake

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In particular with the high-tempo, urgent and punchy tracks White Onions and In Degrees, there is a certain familiar energy that would sound incredible in a live set. In Degrees stands out as it shows signs of something new from the group, almost as if it could be played in a nightclub. This track in particular showcases Foals’ new sound and versatility, with synthesised grooves featuring heavily throughout. As you reach the end of the record you find yourself experiencing a much more pensive note that exists in Sunday and I’m Done With The World (& It’s Done With Me), both featuring serene melodies and with melancholy piano whilst Philippakis’ vocals take centre stage.

Only Foals could take on the current anguish and frustration currently felt in the world and transform it into something wonderful and euphoric, taking the listener on a journey from beginning to end. As front man Yannis said, we will not witness the full impact of the album until we hear the second part, so until then, to be continued…

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ULTIMATE PLAYLIST: BABEHEAVEN

Babeheaven are back with new single Fresh Faced, having just sold out their biggest headline gig at legendary London venue Jazz Cafe in the process. 2019 has already proven to be a step up for the band, having already sold-out shows ranging from Bush Hall and Scala to touring with acts like Loyle CarnerThe Japanese House, and Palace.

The West-London five-piece acclaimed releases thus far have taken them on a rich emotional journey far from – but always back to – their cultural roots, with the strip of the city either side of the Westway having its link to everyone from Lily Allen to Jungle and Blur (let alone the sensory overload of Carnival). Growing up amongst that sense of history and creative atmosphere meant Babeheaven could only ever be musicians, really. Though, Babeheaven’s depictions of those truths ultimately reach far beyond the city that inspires them.

The last year or so has seen the band enter an intense period of writing, recording, and growth. In Nancy, Babeheaven have a front-woman of remarkable vocal and emotional depth: one who is also able to move effortlessly between the worlds of music, fashion, and art. As a badass woman herself,  we asked Nancy to put together her Ultimate playlist of influential women in music. Check it out below!

babeheaven

Watching Me – Jill Scott

I think I started singing because I loved Jill Scott’s voice so much. I wanted to copy her, sound like her and be able to sing all of the parts. I also love her lyrics, shes funny and so cool.

Slow Jam – Tirzah
I think Tirzah’s voice is really amazing, the pairing with Micachus production makes something very special. Tirzah’s album was my most listened to album last year. I had it on loop and still do.

Brakhage – Stereolab
Such interesting song writing, such good harmonies, and melodies layered.

Don’t Cry – It’s Only Rhythm – Grace Jones,

She doesn’t sing on this song- but most of the album is reworks of the same song. Grace is so incredible, I remember seeing her live and she hula hooped whilst singing her entire set. It was crazy.

Cherish the Day – Sade

Sade is the best, Cherish the Day is my all time favourite song by her, when the bass starts in the middle it gets me every time. Her voice is flawless and she is stunningly amazing.

Essence of Sapphire – Dorothy Ashby

The first time I listened to Dorothy Ashby, I was obsessed.  I think she’s so cool I remember looking her up I wanted to know everything about her.

I do (feat SZA) – Cardi B

I cheated and put 2 in one. Cardi is jokes and a great rapper I love nearly all the songs on “Invasion of Privacy”- SZA is a force and sings amazingly her first EP (album thing) was lyrically and sonically very important to me.

Kimson – Warpaint

When this EP (Exquisite Corpse) came out I lost it. It was so cool to see a girl band making such sick music and looking like they didn’t care about what anyone thought of them. They make such good music.

Respect – Rotary Connection

I love Minnie Ripperton, so I put in this song. Rotary Connection have amazing vocal arrangements stacks of harmonies and lux string parts. Love it.

Isobel – Bjork

She is the coolest (how many more times can I say that). She writes about nature in an amazing way and has such a progressive sound. What a G- I recently watched a short documentary about her and was just even more amazed by the music she creates.

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IN CONVERSATION WITH: Maggie Rogers

WORDS BY EMMA LANGFORD     PHOTOS BY MANC WANDERER

It is tempting to imagine how Maggie Rogers’ career would have rolled out, had she not found viral fame from Pharrell’s patronage. This student at the Clive Davis Institute had just started incorporating electronica into her folky songwriting when the visiting producer poured lavish praise on her class project, “Alaska.”

It is ironic that a song about a recent personal reclamation (“And I walked off you/And I walked off an old me”) led to a renewed loss of control in Rogers’ life, one that she has likened to a violation, or, in the naturalistic songwriting she prefers, a bout of freak weather. Now in the twisting and turning world of her career, Rogers is meeting the demand for her. Sold out shows popping up all over the globe and a social following that skyrockets on the daily, there’s no stopping her. Luckily for you though, we managed to catch her for a few minutes…

Are you excited for your show?

Yes, I’m super excited. These are the first shows I’m gonna play with my album out and so it’s cool cause it is the first time the audience has the chance to know the words like I’ve been touring for the past two and a half years it feels like I’m throwing a party now.

What’s been your favourite show on the tour so far?

Every night seems to just get better and better but we did get to play Dublin on a Friday night which is just pretty awesome. I was playing my song ‘Falling Water’ and for anyone who doesn’t know this song it is kinda like an intense emotional ballad and some girl got on her friend’s shoulders and took her top off it was proper rock n roll nothing that I’d expect to see.

When did you first realise that you were gonna become a musician?

I think that’s something you decide for yourself. I started writing songs when I was 13/14 but I think I decided I really wanted to be a musician when I was 17.

Which artists did you listen to when you were growing up?

When I was really young I listened to a lot of classical music as my first instrument was the harp. So I listened to lots of Tchaikovsky and Vivaldi. In high school, I got into listening to mid-2000s Indie music Bon Iver, Vampire Weekend and then I discovered Nick Drake and The Talking Heads.

How would you describe your musical development as you are known for your original sound of folk infused with electronic influences?

It has always been about my own experimentation with production cause I feel like I’ve been writing songs the same way since I was thirteen. It’s just like really narrative and me just in my bedroom trying to understand the world and trying to produce them in ways that keep me creatively challenged. So at first it was folk music then I played in a few rock bands and then I was playing bass in a Punk band for a while and did some DJ stuff. On my EP I did some folk – electronic hybrid but now it feels good cause      I feel like I’ve come round to something that feels more true to my background. It’s really nice to have these real instruments back in the mix.

Would you say dance influences your music?

I don’t think so it is just something I do really naturally. I’ve always loved to move and if you don’t move when listening to music I think you’re subconsciously holding yourself back. My favourite type of music is kinda like dancing while crying it is something you can move to and feel to and I think that is what I’m always trying to do with my music. I think in doing that you can give people different ways in.

What would you say ‘Heard It In The Past Life’ is about and why did you decide to call it that?

I had the title before I had anything else. It is mainly about the last two years of my life where I graduated from college and had this transition. Basically, my private life became very public and I became a professional musician straight out of college and there is just a lot of change. When that change happens different people have different ways of dealing with it or explaining it and my way has always just been writing music.

 

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girls to the front . . 📷 @mlownsphotography

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How would you describe your process of making music as a songwriter and as a producer?

It depends what I am creating on if it is on my guitar. Back In My Body happened that way I wrote it on guitar in my childhood bedroom in Maryland then went to the studio that I had in my parent’s barn and sorta decided what I wanted the sonic architecture to look like. But sometimes like ‘Falling Water’ I’ll just start making a beat or making a track on my computer and then write on top of it so it can happen in a couple of different ways but I think no matter what I always go back to guitar and piano where I really check on the structure of the song because the song is the most important thing.

What’s your favourite song on your new album?

It depends on what kinda mood you’re in. I don’t know if I have an answer to that honestly. Falling Water is the song that took the longest but that’s not always a sheer sign. It really taught me to edit in a new way that I hadn’t before and musically I am probably the proudest of it but lyrically I really love Past Life and from a production standpoint I’m really proud of Overnight. If I wanna dance Say It is probably my favourite. I spent a lot of time with the track listing, thinking about the way I wanted the songs to run into each other. I really love the way the record flows.

What made you want to write Alaska? What headspace were you in at that point?

Alaska was the first song I wrote two years after writer’s block and the last thing I had done when I stopped writing was to go on a hiking trip to Alaska the song isn’t really about the place as much as I was processing the things as I was walking in the place.

How was your experience performing on Saturday Night Live?

It was insane. I just walked in and started crying like I was just really overwhelmed that that was even happening. Even you asking me that question I guess I still can’t believe that even happened. I feel like it is in the realm of dreams you don’t say out loud. It is just like crazy. I grew up watching this TV show and I never thought it was a possibility that I could be on it one day. It was really an honour to be a part of that.

Who are your favourite up and coming artists?

I really love Rosalía and Phoebe Bridgers and this band Big Thief the lead singer in that band Adrianne Linker is one of my favourite songwriters. Phoebe is a friend of mine… I don’t know Rosalía but I think her music is amazing.

Are there any artists that you’d like to collaborate with in the future?

I really love James Blake and am constantly drawn in by his production. I’m a giant Brockhampton fan and would love to work with them but I don’t know if they are open to that cause I know they’re such a collective and I have so much admiration for that. I don’t know maybe Dolly Parton if I’m really dreaming I think that’d be cool.

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FUTURE FIVE: Female artists to get on your radar

WORDS BY EMMA ADLINGTON

As its International Women’s Day, it seems only right to highlight some of the women in music doing incredible things. Here’s our Future Five for this year – may they have every success in 2019 in beyond!

Lava La Rue

Lava La Rue is exactly what you’ve been missing in your life, and from your go-to playlist. Representing the creative music collection NINE8, her debut EP Letra was launched in the summer of last year. She takes inspiration from Erykah Badu and Neneh Cherry and it’s clear to see that Lava La Rue is proud of where she comes from (West London); she’s passionate about sharing her music with the world. Standout tracks like Fucked It and Widdit perfectly showcase that she’s a triple threat: sickly sweet vocals, impactful lyric writing and an enviable rap flow, too. If you don’t know, get to know – Lava La Rue will be on my summer soundtrack for 2019.

Nabihah Iqbal

Nabihah Iqbal has music woven into the very fibre of her being. Her regular NTS shows have gained a loyal following over the past year or so, as she showcases her favourite records spanning nations, decades and genre. From Italo house to reggae to punk, Iqbal never fails to surprise, educate and delight with her selections. She’s not just a talented DJ though, her skills as a producer and live performer leave audiences around the world in awe. Her debut album Weighing of the Heart (released on Ninja Tune in December 2017) is a glimmering, glowing collection of dreamy guitar pop, perfectly combining obvious inspiration from bands like Joy Division and The Cure with her own unforgettable sound. Look out for appearances in Marrakech, London and Leeds to name just a few this year.

Peaness

Hailing from humble roots in the small city of Chester, Peaness have been climbing their way up the ladder of indie pop royalty. Think Strokes-esque guitar chords with divine feminine energy and a punk edge. That’s Peaness. Although still relatively unknown around the country, the three-piece have gained listens on major radio stations like BBC R1 and Radio X. With performances around the UK and Europe gaining the girls an adoring fanbase, we’re excited to see how they progress in 2019 – Kero Kero Bonito support and AYL Fest are already on the agenda. Oh, and they’ve just put out a song called Breakfast about Brexit.

Isabelle Brown

It’s hard to believe that vocalist and songwriter Isabelle Brown is just 15 years old. But this incredibly talented lady could be the next MsLaurynHill; she’s that good. Her dreamy yet soulful vocals take the listener away, evoking a comforting nostalgia and familiar warmth in each and every one of her RnB tracks. Her sound is infectious too – we guarantee you’ll be humming along to Places from the moment you hear it. Isabelle has only released a handful of songs (her 03 EP was released last month) but she’s already been hotly tipped by The Fader and Vogue. We just know she’s one to watch this year.

object blue

2018 was the year that object blue started rising to prominence in the underground electronic music scene. 2019 will be the year that she climbs to the top. With a renewed residency on Rinse FM and regular sets across Europe alongside the likes of Ben UFO and Objekt, there aren’t many DJ-producers as exciting as this enchanting human being. Fans of experimental techno, if you’ve not yet heard her 2018 EP Rex – premiered by Mixmag -, you’re in for a serious aural treat. Erase everything you know about live performances and DJ sets: object blue is taking us on a journey of techno discovery, every single time she appears on stage or on the airwaves.

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ULTIMATE PLAYLIST: SlowHandClap

WORDS BY HANNAH TINKER     PHOTO BY MANC WANDERER

Alternative noise-rock trio, SlowHandClap, came about from their mutual passion for punk and noise rock. Their enthusiasm built and, thus,  the much-appreciated act with the self-deprecating name* came to be. *See definition of ‘slow hand clap’. The Manchester-based act rest amongst the plentiful network of musicians we have in the city and are made up by Sam Bullock on vocals and guitar, Dan Coleman on bass and Michael Duckworth controlling drums.

We asked the trio to put together a playlist for us of their most adored tracks that filter through their inspiration and aspirations for SlowHandClap, following the release of their stonking new single ‘Nobody’s Home’, released on 6th March (listen above). Rife with tracks from the ’90s alternative and ’80s punk scenes, it’s clear to see where the trio draw their influences from – featuring tracks from the likes of Sonic Youth, Pavement, The Fall and Fugazi.

Sure, you might have heard all those acts before, but SlowHandClap project a fresh lease of life within the chaotic genre, controlling their sound with rich chords, melodies and rhythmic grooves to both please and unease the listener – a theme that has been brought to new levels with their latest release. SHC‘s notoriety is clear through support from the likes of BBC IntroducingBBC 6 Music, DHP alongside a loyal fanbase who tread every step of their journey, selling out shows regularly across their hometown base. 

Fictional Decision – Drahla

Are one of our favourite English bands at the moment, they have two great and unique singers and combine the sounds of all our favourite bands like Sonic Youth and Ought and make it their own.

Why Does It Shake? – Protomartyr

Somehow manage to sound minimalist but create a thick atmosphere at the same. This is something we try to strive for being a 3 piece. The singers spoken word vocal style has influenced a lot of our new material too.

Reuters – Pink Flag

Is one of our collective favourite albums, a perfect 10 to me. This song is basically one chord throughout but the vocals and the harmony’s make this tune.

Ether – Andy Gills

Jagged guitar lines and the tight groovy rhythm section are so good on this track. This band make you move and the interplay between the guitar and the bass in all their songs is something we often strive for.

Blindness – The Fall

The bass comes in, then it comes in AGAIN! Just listen.

Pears For Lunch – Girl Band

Girl Band are so unbelievable. The way they use noise to create captivating, cacophonous songs and the surrealistic emotional vocals changed the way we want to write songs.

Silver Rocket – Sonic Youth

Sonic Youth are the primordial ‘ooz’ that birthed us, definitely our biggest influence.

Rattled By The Rush – Pavement

We often get referred to as have a slacker-rock-esque sound and pavement are probably one of the reasons why. So laid back and effortlessly great songs.

Satan In The Wait – Daughters

This song strikes a perfect balance between terrifying and beautiful, we like to try and strike that balance with some of our tunes.

Waiting Room – Fugazi

This is the only track we’ve ever covered. We had to stop doing it because it made all of our songs sound rubbish in comparison.

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FESTIVAL: Inner City Electronic

WORDS BY DAVID WILKINSON

Inner City Electronic returns to Leeds for another triumphant city-wide celebration of the best in electronic music. Taking places across a plethora of Leeds’ best venues, this festival is a 24 hour party mirroring Leeds’ cultural renaissance as a European-style 24 hour city.

With a stellar line-up thats consists of Nina Kraviz, Motor City Drum Ensemble, Bebn UFO, Nightmares On Wax, DJ Stingray, Craig Richards, DJ Boring, Moxie, Orpheu The Wizard, Shanti Celeste, Ralph Lawson, Willow and Ross From Friends and with parties hosted by Resident Advisor, Dimensions, Percolate and Transmission Funk there’s only one city to be in on June 1st.

The venues set aside for the festival are Brudenell Social Club, Church Leeds, Distrikt, Freedom Mills, Hifi, Hope House, Hyde Park Book Club, Old Red Bus Station, Sheaf St, Wire, The Wardrobe plus some other secret locations TBC. With venues ranging from 250 to 1700 capacity, the festival offers a unique experience to explore the city across a range of parties and events, from small intimate art galleries boasting state of the art sound systems to terrace parties, industrial warehouses and even an 18th century church.

These parties will be running alongside a vast array of workshops, showcases talks and masterclasses that focus on musical development, culture and technology and the music industry in general.

Last year’s masterclasses from the likes of KiNK and Prince Fatty, an ‘in conversation’ series of talks with artists Craig Richards, Paul Woolford and Midland and a range of talks and panels with numerous industry panellists. In addition inner city electronic played host to technology showcases from the likes of TPI Audio, Master Sounds, Pioneer, Rane, Akai and many more.

Tickets are still on sale for Inner City Electronic but make sure you’re quick and get yours sorted because they aren’t going to be sticking around for much longer.

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FESTIVAL: Top 5 live acts @ Parklife

WORDS BY DAVID WILKINSON

Since its inception, Parklife Festival has always curated cutting-edge line-ups consisting of a wide range of genres. Now in its the 9th year it’s still growing and enhancing its reputation as the crown jewel in Manchester’s music scene. Take a look at our interview with the founder of  Warehouse Project and Parklife, Sacha Lord, and explore the creative mind behind the festival. This year’s line-up continues to put diverse and exciting acts at the forefront.

During the festival weekend, you do really feel the whole city of Manchester come together for one big party and it doesn’t look like this party is ending anytime soon. Here I’ll give my top 5 picks for who you need to see at this year’s Parklife. The line-up is jam-packed full of talent so this wasn’t easy. But here goes:

Solange

One of the most accomplished acts on the bill this year. Her unique style of soul-infused R&B is made for big festival stages. Her last album, 2016’s A Seat At The Table was genuinely ground-breaking so this isn’t something you want to miss.

Nas

Is there a better hip-hop album than Illmatic? Feel free to answer that one. Nas doesn’t need any introduction. One of the greatest rappers there’s ever been. Again, this is something you don’t want to miss.

Ben UFO & Call Super

Ben UFO & Call Super on their own would probably get onto this list. But both of them together? Absolute shoo-in. Who knows what they have planned for us but one thing’s for sure it’s going to get us dancing. Both are pioneers behind decks so expect some mind-bending greatness when they get the party started.

Ricardo Villalobos

The Chilean-born DJ and producer has been in the game for decades and still manages to completely mesmerise and surprise audiences. It’s difficult to really pin down what to expect from a Villalobos set as they’re always different so just expect something pretty unique.

Pusha T

The last time I saw Pusha T was at Parklife a few years ago. He was amazing that day so pretty sure he’s going to treat us all again this year. Always controversial and never boring if I had to put some money on it I’d say this will be the highlight of the weekend.

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