EP RELEASE: ‘King Of The Dudes’ – Sunflower Bean

WORDS: MATTHEW PYWELL    PHOTO: MANC WANDERER

New York! New York! One of the greatest cities on the planet, a cultural hub and more importantly the birthplace of so many great artists and bands. New York isn’t just a place where some bands were formed, New York has its own style, its own attitude. Responsible for artists such as Blondie, The Velvet Underground, The New York Dolls and The Strokes. Sunflower Bean are helping to carry the torch, passed over by those before, no more so than on their latest EP ‘King Of The Dudes‘.

King Of The Dudes feels like an ode to those that came before. The title track explodes into life just like the soda can on the EP’s cover art, singer Julia Cumming has the fierce, untamed swagger and determination in her voice, just as Debbie Harry before her. She sings of being a leader of men, not by choice but by circumstance. The second track, Come For Me, is a pretty obvious innuendo which details a night for Julia where she’s, “looking for some handsome distraction”. The guitar riffs take in the influence of disco, conjuring up thoughts of flares, vibrant oranges, and fluorescent greens.

On Fear City, riffs rise and fall to constant crescendos, before erupting into Julia’s soaring vocals on the chorus. There are so many good guitar hooks on the track, particularly in the last third, it feels as if they’re fully freed from chains and let loose. The concluding track, The Big One sees the band retreating into the gritty, cataclysmic realms of punk. It has the feeling of a song crafted out of expression rather than methodology, a sweet release of anarchic creative freedom, reminiscent of bands like The New York Dolls.

On King Of The Dudes, Sunflower Bean have taken hold of the fabled style of New York band’s past. With some glorious rock hooks and a take-no-prisoners attitude. While there’s not anything particularly innovative with what Sunflower Bean have done, they do their city justice by representing their own interpretation of rock, punk and disco elements from the ’70s/’80s.

Like this? Read up on all of our blog posts HERE 👀

Comments

comments